Wankhede Stadium

Wankhede ICC WCF.jpg

The Wankhede Stadium is a cricket stadium in Mumbai, Maharashtra. The stadium now has a capacity of 33,108, following renovations for the 2011 Cricket World Cup. Before the upgrade, the capacity was approximately 45,000.[3]

The Wankhede has been host to numerous high-profile cricket matches in the past, most notable being the 2011 Cricket World Cup Final, in which India defeated Sri Lanka by 6 wickets. The stadium witnessed the last match of Sachin Tendulkar's international career. Additionally, it has hosted many other matches in both the 1996 as well as 2011 Cricket World Cup. The stadium is also the host to the match in which Ravi Shastri hit six sixes in an over. As of 19 July 2017, it has hosted 25 Tests, 20 ODIs and 5 T20Is.

Mumbai has seen Test matches played at three different grounds. The Bombay Gymkhana ground hosted the first ever Test in India, in 1933–34 against England. After World War II, the Cricket Club of India Ltd's Brabourne Stadium – second ground of the city – was used for 17 Tests. The Wankhede Stadium was built after disputes between the Cricket Club of India, which owns the Brabourne Stadium, and the Mumbai Cricket Association over the allocation of tickets for cricket matches.[4] This became severe after the Test between India and England in 1973. At the initiative of S. K. Wankhede, a politician and the secretary of the Mumbai Cricket Association, MCA built the new stadium in South Mumbai near the Churchgate station. It was built in approx. six months and opened in time for the final Test between India and the West Indies in 1975.[2] Since then the Wankhede stadium has taken over from Brabourne Stadium as the main cricketing venue in the city. It was named after the Association’s President Barrister Sheshrao Wankhede in 1974.

It staged its first Test in the 1974–75 season when the West Indies toured India. Clive Lloyd scored an unbeaten 242 and in Pataudi's last hurrah, India lost by 201 runs. The Test also featured a crowd disturbance after a fan who rushed onto the ground to greet Lloyd was treated roughly by the police. India's first victory here was posted against the New Zealand two seasons later. The stadium has been a witness to great innings like Sunil Gavaskar's 205 against the West Indies and Alvin Kallicharan's 187 in the same game in the 1978–79 series and all round heroics like Ian Botham's century and thirteen wickets in the Jubilee Test in 1979–80, which England won by ten wickets. The highest score by an Indian at the Wankhede Stadium is Vinod Kambli's 224 against England in 1992–93 in only his third Test. Incidentally Ravi Shastri's six sixes in an over off Baroda's Tilak Raj in Ranji Trophy, en route to the fastest double-hundred in first-class cricket were recorded on this ground in 1984–85. His unbeaten 200 in 113 minutes off 123 balls with 13 fours and 13 sixes at this ground, is the fastest double century in first-class cricket ever since.A

The Wankhede Stadium was built in 1975 and the first Test match played was between India and West Indies from 23 to 28 January 1975. The Stadium was built at a time when only Test Matches were played and with the advent of One Day Cricket and Twenty 20 Cricket, the demands of a Stadium from spectator point of view have totally changed.

Since ICC World Cup Cricket 2011 was to be hosted by India, Bangladesh and Sri Lanka, and Mumbai was selected to host the final, it was decided to redevelop the Wankhede Stadium to suit the modern facilities and comfort of spectators.

The Managing Committee invited presentations from reputed Architects and shortlisted M/s. P.K. Das & Associates and M/s. Shashi Prabhu & Associates to jointly draw up a project for the redevelopment of the Wankhede Stadium. While redeveloping the Stadium, major changes were at the North end and the South end with better facilities to the spectators in terms of bucket seating, large number of toilets and food courts.

This page was last edited on 15 June 2018, at 16:28 (UTC).
Reference: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wankhede_Stadium under CC BY-SA license.

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