Shades of green

Color icon green.svg
Varieties of the color green may differ in hue, chroma (also called saturation or intensity) or lightness (or value, tone, or brightness), or in two or three of these qualities. Variations in value are also called tints and shades, a tint being a green or other hue mixed with white, a shade being mixed with black. A large selection of these various colors is shown below.

Green is common in nature, especially in plants. Many plants are green mainly because of a complex chemical known as chlorophyll which is involved in photosynthesis. Many shades of green have been named after plants or are related to plants. Due to varying ratios of chlorophylls (and different amounts as well as other plant pigments being present), the plant kingdom exhibits many shades of green in both hue (true color) and value (lightness/darkness). The chlorophylls in living plants have distinctive green colors, while dried or cooked portions of plants are different shades of green due to the chlorophyll molecules losing their inner magnesium ion.

Artichoke is a color that is a representation of the color of a raw fresh uncooked artichoke. Another name for this color is artichoke green.

The first recorded use of "artichoke green" as a color name in English was in 1905.

This is the color called artichoke green in Pantone. The source is Pantone 18-0125 TPX

Asparagus is a tone of green that is named after the vegetable. Crayola created this color in 1993 as one of the 16 to be named in the Name the Color Contest.

This page was last edited on 13 May 2018, at 00:00.
Reference: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Variations_of_green under CC BY-SA license.

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