Subcutaneous tissue

Skin.png
The subcutaneous tissue (from Latin subcutaneous, meaning 'beneath the skin'), also called the hypodermis, hypoderm (from Greek, meaning 'beneath the skin'), subcutis, or superficial fascia, is the lowermost layer of the integumentary system in vertebrates. The types of cells found in the hypodermis are fibroblasts, adipose cells, and macrophages. The hypodermis is derived from the mesoderm, but unlike the dermis, it is not derived from the dermatome region of the mesoderm. In arthropods, the hypodermis is an epidermal layer of cells that secretes the chitinous cuticle. The term also refers to a layer of cells lying immediately below the epidermis of plants.

The hypodermis is beneath dermis which is beneath epidermis. It is used mainly for fat storage.

A layer of tissue lies immediately below the dermis of vertebrate skin. It is often referred to as subcutaneous tissue though this is a less precise and anatomically inaccurate term. The hypodermis consists primarily of loose connective tissue and lobules of fat. It contains larger blood vessels and nerves than those found in the dermis.

Subcutaneous tissue consists of:

In some animals, such as whales and hibernating mammals, the hypodermis forms an important insulating layer and/or food store.

In some plants, the hypodermis is a layer of cells immediately below the epidermis of leaves. It is often mechanically strengthened, for example, in pine leaves, forming an extra protective layer or a water storage tissue.

This page was last edited on 9 May 2018, at 00:52.
Reference: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Subcutaneous_fat under CC BY-SA license.

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