Ohio

Flag of Ohio
State seal of Ohio
Ohio /ˈh./ (About this sound listen) is a Midwestern state in the Great Lakes region of the United States. Ohio is the 34th largest by area, the 7th most populous, and the 10th most densely populated of the 50 United States. The state's capital and largest city is Columbus.

The state takes its name from the Ohio River. The name originated from the Seneca language word ohiːyo', meaning "great river" or "large creek". Partitioned from the Northwest Territory, the state was admitted to the Union as the 17th state (and the first under the Northwest Ordinance) on March 1, 1803. Ohio is historically known as the "Buckeye State" after its Ohio buckeye trees, and Ohioans are also known as "Buckeyes".

The government of Ohio is composed of the executive branch, led by the Governor; the legislative branch, which comprises the Ohio General Assembly; and the judicial branch, which is led by the state Supreme Court. Ohio occupies 16 seats in the United States House of Representatives. Ohio is known for its status as both a swing state and a bellwether in national elections. Six Presidents of the United States have been elected who had Ohio as their home state.

Ohio derives from Seneca (an Iroquois language) as their name for the Ohio River/ Alleghany River, Ohi:yo. This is pronounced "Oh-hee-yoh," with the i sound being held an extra second. Folk etymology claims that this translates as "Beautiful River," however it appears that the word can be broken down as "O-" (pronoun prefix. Translates as "it" & implies that whatever is about to follow it is considered a permanent condition of the item), "Hih" (verb. to spill) & "Gihedenyo" (noun. creek, stream). That being said, the most sensible translation ought to be "Continuously-spilling Creek," or "Continuously-giving creek." The word for "creek" is used instead of "river" since it still flows into a larger river, the Mississippi.

The common accent of Ohio shifts regularly, so there are multiple different accepted ways of saying Ohio that have been common throughout the last century, such as "Oh-hai-yuh," "Uh-hai-yoh," & "Uh-hai-yuh." The most recent shift that is beginning to surface sounds something along the lines of "wh-hai-yuh."

Ohio's geographic location has proven to be an asset for economic growth and expansion. Because Ohio links the Northeast to the Midwest, much cargo and business traffic passes through its borders along its well-developed highways. Ohio has the nation's 10th largest highway network and is within a one-day drive of 50% of North America's population and 70% of North America's manufacturing capacity. To the north, Lake Erie gives Ohio 312 miles (502 km) of coastline, which allows for numerous cargo ports. Ohio's southern border is defined by the Ohio River (with the border being at the 1792 low-water mark on the north side of the river), and much of the northern border is defined by Lake Erie. Ohio's neighbors are Pennsylvania to the east, Michigan to the northwest, Lake Erie to the north, Indiana to the west, Kentucky on the south, and West Virginia on the southeast. Ohio's borders were defined by metes and bounds in the Enabling Act of 1802 as follows:

This page was last edited on 21 June 2018, at 00:11 (UTC).
Reference: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ohio under CC BY-SA license.

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