Lolland

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Lolland (Danish pronunciation: ; formerly spelled Laaland, literally "low land") is the fourth largest island of Denmark, with an area of 1,243 km2 (480 sq mi). Located in the Baltic sea, it is part of Region Sjælland (Region Zealand). As of 1 January 2013, it has 62,578 inhabitants.

Lolland is also known as the "pancake island" because of its flatness: the highest point of the entire island is 25 m (82 ft) above sea level, just outside the village of Horslunde. The island has been an important communication highway, among others for Nazi Germany during World War II. Historically, sugar beet has been grown in Lolland. Sugar is still a major industry, visible from the large number of sugar beet fields.

The largest town of Lolland is Nakskov, with 12,600 residents. Other main towns are Maribo (6,000 residents), which hosts the seat of the Diocese of Lolland and Falster, Sakskøbing (3,500 residents) and Rødby (2,500 residents).

Since January 1, 2007, Lolland has been administered by two municipalities, Lolland covering the western two thirds, and Guldborgsund uniting the eastern third with the neighbouring island Falster.

Lolland has motor and railway links both to the island of Falster to the east and to Germany (the German island Fehmarn, linked to the mainland) via ferry. European route E47 links Copenhagen to Hamburg (Germany) via Lolland.

Route E47 from Copenhagen crosses the Guldborgsund strait between Lolland and Falster via a modern tunnel, but the motorway currently terminates at Rødbyhavn where a ferry carries vehicles and trains to Fehmarn. This ferry, in continuous service since 1963, serves 6 passenger trains per day. Freight trains and night trains do not use the ferry; they take the longer way to the mainland via the Great Belt Bridge, then Funen and Jutland.

This page was last edited on 22 April 2018, at 12:33 (UTC).
Reference: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lolland under CC BY-SA license.

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