Logarithmic scale

A logarithmic scale is a nonlinear scale used when there is a large range of quantities. Common uses include earthquake strength, sound loudness, light intensity, and pH of solutions.

It is based on orders of magnitude, rather than a standard linear scale, so the value represented by each equidistant mark on the scale is the value at the previous mark multiplied by a constant.

Logarithmic scales are also used in slide rules for multiplying or dividing numbers by adding or subtracting lengths on the scales.

The following are examples of commonly used logarithmic scales, where a larger quantity results in a higher value:

The following are examples of commonly used logarithmic scales, where a larger quantity results in a lower (or negative) value:

Some of our senses operate in a logarithmic fashion (Weber–Fechner law), which makes logarithmic scales for these input quantities especially appropriate. In particular our sense of hearing perceives equal ratios of frequencies as equal differences in pitch. In addition, studies of young children in an isolated tribe have shown logarithmic scales to be the most natural display of numbers in some cultures. It can also be used for geographical purposes like for measuring the speed of earthquakes.

This page was last edited on 28 February 2018, at 21:44.
Reference: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Logarithmic_scale under CC BY-SA license.

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