Greater London

Greater London administrative area in England.svg
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Greater London is a region of England which forms the administrative boundaries of London, as well as a county for the purposes of the lieutenancies. It is organised into 33 local government districts: the 32 London boroughs (which make up the county of Greater London) and the City of London (which is a separate county, but still part of the region). The Greater London Authority, based in Southwark, is responsible for strategic local government across the region and consists of the Mayor of London and the London Assembly. The City of London Corporation is responsible for the local government of only the City of London.

The county of Greater London was created on 1 April 1965 through the London Government Act 1963.[3][4][5] Administratively, Greater London was first established as a sui generis council area under the Greater London Council between 1963 and 1986. The area was re-established as a region in 1994, and the Greater London Authority formed in 2000.

The region covers 1,572 km2 (607 sq mi) and had a population of 8,174,000 at the 2011 census.[6][7] The Greater London county covers the same territory as the London region, save for the City of London which is a separate county. In 2012, it had the highest GVA per capita in the United Kingdom at £37,232.[8][9] The Greater London Built-up Area—used in some national statistics—is a measure of the continuous urban area of London, and therefore includes areas outside the administrative region.

The term Greater London has been and still is used to describe different areas in governance, statistics, history and common parlance.

In terms of ceremonial counties, London is divided into the small City of London and the much wider Greater London. This arrangement has come about because as the area of London grew and absorbed neighbouring settlements, a series of administrative reforms did not amalgamate the City of London with the surrounding metropolitan area, and its unique political structure was retained. Outside the limited boundaries of the City, a variety of arrangements has governed the wider area since 1855, culminating in the creation of the Greater London administrative area in 1965.

The term Greater London was used well before 1965, particularly to refer to the Metropolitan Police District (such as in the 1901 census),[10] the area of the Metropolitan Water Board (favoured by the London County Council for statistics),[11] the London Passenger Transport Area and the area defined by the Registrar General as the Greater London Conurbation.[12] The Greater London Arterial Road Programme was devised between 1913 and 1916.[13] One of the larger early forms was the Greater London Planning Region, devised in 1927, which occupied 1,856 square miles (4,810 km2) and included 9 million people.[11]

Although the London County Council (LCC) was created covering the County of London in 1889, the county did not cover all the built-up area, particularly West Ham and East Ham, and many of the LCC housing projects, including the vast Becontree Estates, were outside its boundaries.[14] The LCC pressed for an alteration in its boundaries soon after the end of the First World War, noting that within the Metropolitan and City Police Districts there were 122 housing authorities. A Royal Commission on London Government was set up to consider the issue.[15][16] The LCC proposed a vast new area for Greater London, with a boundary somewhere between the Metropolitan Police District and the home counties.[17] Protests were made at the possibility of including Windsor, Slough and Eton in the authority.[18] The Commission made its report in 1923, rejecting the LCC's scheme. Two minority reports favoured change beyond the amalgamation of smaller urban districts, including both smaller borough councils and a central authority for strategic functions. The London Traffic Act 1924 was a result of the Commission.[19] Reform of local government in the County of London and its environs was next considered by the Royal Commission on Local Government in Greater London, chaired by Sir Edwin Herbert, which issued the 'Herbert Report' after three years of work in 1960. The commission applied three tests to decide if a community should form part of Greater London: how strong is the area as an independent centre in its own right; how strong are its ties to London; and how strongly is it drawn outwards towards the country rather than inwards towards London.

This page was last edited on 16 July 2018, at 11:06 (UTC).
Reference: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greater_London under CC BY-SA license.

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