God the Son

Principal symbol of Christianity
God the Son (Greek: Θεός ὁ υἱός) is the second person of the Trinity in Christian theology. The doctrine of the Trinity identifies Jesus as the embodiment of God the Son, united in essence (consubstantial) but distinct in person with regard to God the Father and God the Holy Spirit (the first and third persons of the Trinity).

The term "God the Son" is not found in the Bible, but is found in later Christian sources. By scribal error the term is in one medieval manuscript, MS No.1985, where Galatians 2:20 has "Son of God" changed to "God the Son".

The term in English follows Latin usage as found in the Athanasian Creed and other texts of the early church:

The distinction holds true in other modern languages apart from English, for example:

The term deus filius is used in the Athanasian Creed and formulas such as Deus Pater, Deus Filius, Deus Spiritus Sanctus: Et non tres Dii, sed unus est Deus.

The term is used by Saint Augustine in his On the Trinity, for example in discussion of the Son's obedience to God the Father: deo patri deus filius obediens.

This page was last edited on 23 June 2018, at 01:07 (UTC).
Reference: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/God_the_Son under CC BY-SA license.

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