Elisabeth of the Palatinate

1636 Elisabeth of Bohemia.jpg
Elisabeth of Bohemia-Palatinate at age 12 from "A Sister of Prince Rupert" by E. Godfrey. According from the text the original painting this photo is based on was painted by Kaspar Barlens and is located in the Herford Museum.
Elisabeth of the Palatinate (26 December 1618 – 11 February 1680), also known as Elisabeth of Bohemia, Princess Elisabeth of the Palatinate, or Princess-Abbess of Herford Abbey, was the eldest daughter of Frederick V, Elector Palatine (who was briefly King of Bohemia), and Elizabeth Stuart. Elisabeth of the Palatinate is a philosopher best known for her correspondence with René Descartes.[1] She was critical of Descartes' dualistic metaphysics and her work anticipated the metaphysical concerns of later philosophers.[2][3]

Elisabeth Simmern van Pallandt was born on December 26, 1618 in Heidelberg.[1][4] She was the third of thirteen children and eldest daughter of Frederick V, Elector Palatine, and Elizabeth Stuart, daughter of James I of England and sister of Charles I.[1]

Much of Elizabeth's early life outside of her familial relations is unknown.[5] After a short, unsuccessful reign in Bohemia, Elisabeth's parents were forced into exile in the Netherlands in 1620.[2][6] Elisabeth stayed with her grandmother Louise Juliana of Nassau in Heidelberg before moving the Netherlands at the age of nine.[5][6]

Elisabeth had a wide ranging education, studying philosophy, astronomy, mathematics, jurisprudence, history, modern and classical languages.[4][6] Her siblings nicknamed her "La Grecque" ("The Greek") based on her skill with the ancient language.[2][6]

Elisabeth also studied the fine arts including painting, music and dancing.[1] She may have been tutored by Constantijn Huygens.[1]

In 1633, Elisabeth received a proposal of marriage from Władysław IV Vasa, King of Poland.[4][5] The marriage would have been beneficial to the Palatine fortunes, but the king was a Catholic, and Elisabeth refused to convert from her Protestant faith in order to facilitate the marriage.[4][5]

Edward Reynolds dedicated his Treatise on the passions and the faculties of the soule of man (1640) to Elisabeth.[1] Although the exact context of the dedication is unknown, the dedication suggests that Elisabeth had seen a draft of the work.[1]

In 1642, Elisabeth read Descartes' Meditations on First Philosophy.[7]

This page was last edited on 8 June 2018, at 17:33 (UTC).
Reference: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elisabeth_of_Bohemia,_Princess_Palatine under CC BY-SA license.

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