DualShock

DualShock Wordmark.png
PSX-DualShock-Controller.jpg
The DualShock (originally Dual Shock; trademarked as DUALSHOCK or DUAL SHOCK) is a line of gamepads with vibration-feedback developed by Sony Interactive Entertainment for the PlayStation family of systems. The DualShock was introduced in Japan in late 1997 and launched in the North American market in May 1998. First introduced as a secondary peripheral for the original PlayStation, an updated version of the PlayStation console included the controller. Sony subsequently phased out the digital controller that was originally included with the console, as well as the Sony Dual Analog Controller. As of 2008, over 28 million DualShock controllers have been sold under the brand's name, excluding bundled controllers.

Controller Port

Body

Cable

The DualShock Analog Controller (SCPH-1200), a controller capable of providing vibration feedback, was based on the onscreen actions taking place in the game (if the game supports it), as well as analog input through two analog sticks. Its name derives from its use of two (dual) vibration motors (shock). These motors are housed within the handles of the controller, with the left one being larger and more powerful than the one on the right, so as to allow for varying levels of vibration. The DualShock differs from the Nintendo 64's Rumble Pak in this respect as the Rumble Pak only uses a single motor. The Rumble Pak also uses batteries to power the vibration function while all corded varieties of the DualShock use power supplied by the PlayStation. (However, some third party DualShock-compatible controllers use batteries instead of the PlayStation's power supply.) The rumble feature of the DualShock is similar to the one featured on the first edition of the Japanese Dual Analog Controller, a feature that was removed shortly after that controller was released.

The DualShock, like its predecessor the Dual Analog controller, has two analog sticks. Unlike the earlier controller, the DualShock's analog sticks feature textured rubber grips rather than the smooth plastic tips with recessed grooves found on the Dual Analog controller. The DualShock also features two additional buttons when compared to the Dual Analog, L3 and R3, which are triggered by depressing the analog sticks. Other differences between Dual Analog and the DualShock include the longer grips/handles and slightly different L2/R2 buttons.

This page was last edited on 26 May 2018, at 02:55.
Reference: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DualShock_4 under CC BY-SA license.

Related Topics

Recently Viewed