Decorator pattern

In object-oriented programming, the decorator pattern is a design pattern that allows behavior to be added to an individual object, either statically or dynamically, without affecting the behavior of other objects from the same class. The decorator pattern is often useful for adhering to the Single Responsibility Principle, as it allows functionality to be divided between classes with unique areas of concern. The decorator pattern is structurally nearly identical to the chain of responsibility pattern, the difference being that in a chain of responsibility, exactly one of the classes handles the request, while for the decorator, all classes handle the request.

The Decorator design pattern is one of the twenty-three well-known GoF design patterns that describe how to solve recurring design problems to design flexible and reusable object-oriented software, that is, objects that are easier to implement, change, test, and reuse.

What problems can the Decorator design pattern solve?

When using subclassing, different subclasses extend a class in different ways. But an extension is bound to the class at compile-time and can't be changed at run-time.

What solution does the Decorator design pattern describe?

Define Decorator objects that

This page was last edited on 10 May 2018, at 16:36.
Reference: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Decorator_pattern under CC BY-SA license.

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