Crawley

Goff's Park House, Crawley, winter scene
Official logo of Borough of Crawley

Crawley (About this sound pronunciation ) is a town and borough in West Sussex, England. It is 28 miles (45 km) south of Charing Cross (London), 18 miles (29 km) north of Brighton and Hove, and 32 miles (51 km) north-east of the county town of Chichester. Crawley covers an area of 17.36 square miles (44.96 km2) and had a population of 106,597 at the time of the 2011 Census.

The area has been inhabited since the Stone Age,[2] and was a centre of ironworking in Roman times. Crawley developed slowly as a market town from the 13th century, serving the surrounding villages in the Weald. Its location on the main road from London to Brighton brought passing trade, which encouraged the development of coaching inns. A rail link to London opened in 1841.

Gatwick Airport, nowadays one of Britain's busiest international airports, opened on the edge of the town in the 1940s, encouraging commercial and industrial growth. After the Second World War, the British Government planned to move large numbers of people and jobs out of London and into new towns around South East England. The New Towns Act 1946 designated Crawley as the site of one of these.[3] A master plan was developed for the establishment of new residential, commercial, industrial and civic areas, and rapid development greatly increased the size and population of the town over a few decades.

The town contains 13 residential neighbourhoods radiating out from the core of the old market town, and separated by main roads and railway lines. The nearby communities of Ifield, Pound Hill and Three Bridges were absorbed into the new town at various stages in its development. In 2009, expansion was being planned in the west and north-west of the town, in cooperation with Horsham District Council.[4] Economically, the town has developed into the main centre of industry and employment between London and the south coast. Its large industrial area supports manufacturing and service companies, many of them connected with the airport. The commercial and retail sectors continue to expand.[3]

The area may have been settled during the Mesolithic period: locally manufactured flints of the Horsham Culture type have been found to the southwest of the town.[2] Tools and burial mounds from the Neolithic period, and burial mounds and a sword from the Bronze Age, have also been discovered.[5][6] Crawley is on the western edge of the High Weald, which produced iron for more than 2,000 years from the Iron Age onwards.[7] Goffs Park—now a recreational area in the south of the town—was the site of two late Iron Age furnaces.[8] Ironworking and mineral extraction continued throughout Roman times, particularly in the Broadfield area where many furnaces were built.[5][9]

In the 5th century, Saxon settlers named the area Crow's Leah—meaning a crow-infested clearing, or Crow's Wood.[10] This name evolved over time, and the present spelling appeared by the early 14th century.[5] By this time, nearby settlements were more established: the Saxon church at Worth, for example, dates from between 950 and 1050 AD.[11]

Although Crawley itself is not mentioned in the Domesday Book of 1086,[12] the nearby settlements of Ifield and Worth are recorded.[13] The first written record of Crawley dates from 1202, when a licence was issued by King John for a weekly market on Wednesdays.[14] Crawley grew slowly in importance over the next few centuries, but was boosted in the 18th century by the construction of the turnpike road between London and Brighton. When this was completed in 1770, travel between the newly fashionable seaside resort and London became safer and quicker, and Crawley (located approximately halfway between the two) prospered as a coaching halt.[15] By 1839 it offered almost an hourly service to both destinations.[16][17] The George, a timber-framed house dating from the 15th century, expanded to become a large coaching inn, taking over adjacent buildings. Eventually an annexe had to be built in the middle of the wide High Street; this survived until the 1930s.[18] The original building has become the George Hotel, with conference facilities and 84 bedrooms; it retains many period features including an iron fireback.[19][20]

This page was last edited on 11 July 2018, at 10:38 (UTC).
Reference: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crawley under CC BY-SA license.

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