Champs-Élysées

Avenue des Champs-Élysées July 24, 2009 N1.jpg

The Avenue des Champs-Élysées (French pronunciation:  (About this sound listen)) is an avenue in the 8th arrondissement of Paris, France, 1.9 kilometres (1.2 mi) long and 70 metres (230 ft) wide, running between the Place de la Concorde and the Place Charles de Gaulle, where the Arc de Triomphe is located. It is known for its theatres, cafés, and luxury shops, for the annual Bastille Day military parade, and as the finish of the Tour de France cycle race.

The name is French for the Elysian Fields, the paradise for dead heroes in Greek mythology. Champs-Élysées is widely regarded to be one of the most recognisable avenues in the world.

The avenue runs for 1.91 km (1.18 mi) through the 8th arrondissement in northwestern Paris, from the Place de la Concorde in the east, with the Obelisk of Luxor,[1] to the Place Charles de Gaulle (formerly the Place de l'Étoile) in the west, location of the Arc de Triomphe. The Champs-Élysées forms part of the Axe historique.

The lower part of the Champs-Élysées, from the Place de la Concorde to the Rond-Point, runs through the Jardin des Champs-Élysées, a park which contains the Grand Palais, the Petit Palais, the Théâtre Marigny, and several restaurants, gardens and monuments. The Élysée Palace, the official residence of the Presidents of France, borders the park, but is not on the Avenue itself. The Champs-Élysées ends at the Arc de Triomphe, built to honour the victories of Napoleon Bonaparte.

The historical axis, looking west from Place de la Concorde (the Obelisk of Luxor is in the foreground).

The Champs-Elysées seen from the Arc de Triomphe.

View at pedestrian level as seen from the middle of the avenue looking west,

This page was last edited on 9 July 2018, at 03:15 (UTC).
Reference: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Champs-%C3%89lys%C3%A9es under CC BY-SA license.

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