Book of Jonah

The Book of Jonah is a book of the Nevi’im (“Prophets”) in the Hebrew Bible. It tells of a Hebrew prophet named Jonah son of Amittai who is sent by God to prophesy the destruction of Nineveh but tries to escape the divine mission.[1] Set in the reign of Jeroboam II (786–746 BC), it was probably written in the post-exilic period, some time between the late 5th to early 4th century BC.[2] The story has a long interpretive history and has become well-known through popular children's stories. In Judaism it is the Haftarah, read during the afternoon of Yom Kippur to instill reflection on God's willingness to forgive those who repent;[3] it remains a popular story among Christians. It is also retold in the Quran.

Unlike the other Prophets, the book of Jonah is almost entirely narrative, with the exception of the poem in chapter 2. The actual prophetic word against Nineveh is given only in passing through the narrative. As with any good narrative, the story of Jonah has a setting, characters, a plot, and themes. It also relies heavily on such literary devices as irony.

Jonah is the central character in the Book of Jonah, in which God commands him to go to the city of Nineveh to prophesy against it "for their great wickedness is come up before me,"[5] but Jonah instead attempts to flee from "the presence of the Lord" by going to Jaffa (sometimes transliterated as Joppa or Joppe), and sailing to Tarshish.[6] A huge storm arises and the sailors, realizing that it is no ordinary storm, cast lots and discover that Jonah is to blame.[7] Jonah admits this and states that if he is thrown overboard, the storm will cease.[8] The sailors refuse to do this and continue rowing, but all their efforts fail and they are eventually forced to throw Jonah overboard.[9] As a result, the storm calms and the sailors then offer sacrifices to God.[10] Jonah is miraculously saved by being swallowed by a large fish, in whose belly he spends three days and three nights.[11] While in the great fish, Jonah prays to God in his affliction and commits to thanksgiving and to paying what he has vowed.[12] God then commands the fish to vomit Jonah out.[13]

God again commands Jonah to travel to Nineveh and prophesy to its inhabitants.[14] This time he goes and enters the city, crying, "In forty days Nineveh shall be overthrown."[15] After Jonah has walked across Nineveh, the people of Nineveh begin to believe his word and proclaim a fast.[16] The king of Nineveh puts on sackcloth and sits in ashes, making a proclamation which decrees fasting, the wearing of sackcloth, prayer, and repentance.[17] God sees their repentant hearts and spares the city at that time.[18] The entire city is humbled and broken with the people (and even the animals)[19][20] in sackcloth and ashes.[21]

Displeased by this, Jonah refers to his earlier flight to Tarshish while asserting that, since God is merciful, it was inevitable that God would turn from the threatened calamities.[22] He then leaves the city and makes himself a shelter, waiting to see whether or not the city will be destroyed.[23] God causes a plant (in Hebrew a kikayon) to grow over Jonah's shelter to give him some shade from the sun.[24] Later, God causes a worm to bite the plant's root and it withers.[25] Jonah, now being exposed to the full force of the sun, becomes faint and pleads for God to kill him.[26]

And God said to Jonah: "Art thou greatly angry for the Kikayon?" And he said: "I am greatly angry, even unto death."
And the LORD said: "Thou hast had pity on the gourd, for which thou hast not laboured, neither madest it grow, which came up in a night, and perished in a night;
and should not I have pity on Nineveh, that great city, wherein are more than sixscore thousand persons that cannot discern between their right hand and their left hand, and also much cattle?"

The story of Jonah has numerous theological implications, and this has long been recognized. In early translations of the Hebrew Bible, Jewish translators tended to remove anthropomorphic imagery in order to prevent the reader from misunderstanding the ancient texts.[citation needed] This tendency is evidenced in both the Aramaic translations (e.g. the Targums) and the Greek translations (e.g. the Septuagint). As far as the Book of Jonah is concerned, Targum Jonah offers a good example of this:[citation needed]

In Jonah 1:6, the Masoretic Text (MT) reads, "...perhaps God will pay heed to us...." Targum Jonah translates this passage as: "...perhaps there will be mercy from the Lord upon us...." The captain's proposal is no longer an attempt to change the divine will; it is an attempt to appeal to divine mercy. Furthermore, in Jonah 3:9, the MT reads, "Who knows, God may turn and relent ?" Targum Jonah translates this as, "Whoever knows that there are sins on his conscience let him repent of them and we will be pitied before the Lord." God does not change His mind; He shows pity.[citation needed]

This page was last edited on 10 July 2018, at 01:42 (UTC).
Reference: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Book_of_Jonah under CC BY-SA license.

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